Authors

D.T. Shindell, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia Earth Institute, NY
J.-F. Lamarque, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO
M. Schulz, Meteorologisk Institutt, Oslo, Norway
M. Flanner, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
C. Jiao, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
M. Chin, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
P.J. Young, University of Colorado; NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, Colorado; Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
Y.H. Lee, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia Earth Institute, NY
L. Rotstayn, Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, Vic, Australia
N. Mahowald, Cornell University
G. Milly, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia Earth Institute, NY
G. Faluvegi, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia Earth Institute, NY
Y. Balkanski, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement LSCE-IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
W.J. Collins, Met Office, Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK; University of Reading, Reading, UK
A.J. Conley, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO
S. Dalsoren, Center for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo (CICERO), Oslo, Norway
R. Easter, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
S. Ghan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
L. Horowitz, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ
Xiaohong Liu, University of Wyoming; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
G. Myhre, Center for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo (CICERO), Oslo, Norway
T. Nagashima, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki, Japan
V. Naik, UCAR/NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ
S.T. Rumbold, Met Office, Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK
R. Skeie, Center for International Climate and Environmental Research Oslo (CICERO), Oslo, Norway
K. Sudo, Nagoya University, Japan
S. Szopa, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement LSCE-IPSL, Gif-sur-Yvette, France
T. Takemura, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
A. Voulgarakis, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Columbia Earth Institute, NY; Imperial College London, London, UK
J.-H. Yoon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA
F. Lo, Cornell University

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-15-2013

Abstract

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980–2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/ Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects).

DOI

10.5194/acp-13-2939-2013

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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