Authors

P.J. De Mott, Colorado State University
O. Möhler, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
O. Stetzer, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
Gabor Vali, University of WyomingFollow
G. Vali, University of Wyoming
Z. Levin, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Cyprus Institute, Nicosia, Cyprus
M.D. Petters, North Carolina State University
M. Murakami, Meteorological Research Institute of Japan, Tsukuba City, Japan
T. Leisner, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
U. Bundke, Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
H. Klein, Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
Z.A. Kanji, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
R. Cotton, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
Hazel Jones
S. Benz, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
M. Brinkmann, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
D. Rzesanke, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
H. Saathoff, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany
M. Nicolet, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, ETH Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland
A. Saito, Meteorological Research Institute of Japan, Tsukuba City, Japan
B. Nillius, Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
H. Bingemer, Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany
J. Abbatt, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
K. Ardon, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
E. Ganor, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel
D.G. Georgakopoulos, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
C. Saunders, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-1-2011

Abstract

The accuracy and precision of current ice nuclei (IN) instruments is reported and progress made toward addressing apparent shortfalls in past ice nuclei measurements is studied. Most new IN instruments can measure at controlled conditions below water saturation and, in some cases, well below -40°C. The UF FRIDGE and the Tel Aviv University (TAU) FRIDGE have showed much lower concentrations of ice nuclei than any of the CFDC instruments. A postanalysis of the measurements has revealed that the petroleum jelly used to increase thermal contact between the collection filter and the cooling stage became mobile at the low pressure operational conditions and condensed on the ice nuclei, leading to a deactivation effect. The longer evaporation section of the ZINC instrument permits extension of measurements to a higher water supersaturation bound before water droplets begin to survive through to the optical detector.

DOI

10.1175/2011BAMS3119.1

Comments

© Copyright 2011 American Meteorological Society (AMS). Permission to use figures, tables, and brief excerpts from this work in scientific and educational works is hereby granted provided that the source is acknowledged. Any use of material in this work that is determined to be “fair use” under Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act September 2010 Page 2 or that satisfies the conditions specified in Section 108 of the U.S. Copyright Act (17 USC §108, as revised by P.L. 94-553) does not require the AMS’s permission. Republication, systematic reproduction, posting in electronic form, such as on a web site or in a searchable database, or other uses of this material, except as exempted by the above statement, requires written permission or a license from the AMS. Additional details are provided in the AMS Copyright Policy, available on the AMS Web site located at (http://www.ametsoc.org/) or from the AMS at 617-227-2425 or copyrights@ametsoc.org.

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