2015 DNP Scholarship Day

Start Date

16-4-2015 2:40 PM

Description

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic medical condition placing significant financial burden on the prison healthcare system. Changing demographics in prisons have challenged facilities to develop innovative disease management approaches to enhance outcomes while decreasing expenditures. Programs focused on self-management strategies have demonstrated efficacy through enhanced glycemic control, prevention of adverse outcomes, and reductions in associated healthcare costs.

Purpose: This study aims to analyze one prison’s approach to diabetes management by examining qualitative data regarding observed health outcomes. The program incorporates diabetes education, nutritional counseling, self-monitoring techniques, lifestyle modification, and incentives for active participation to encourage an active role in health and wellness.

Methods: Data were collected through personal interviews with members of the healthcare team overseeing those inmates participating in the program. A standard questionnaire was utilized to evaluate staff’s perceptions and observed outcomes associated with this approach. Data collected are being examined using content analysis to assess for trends or variations in participant responses, allowing for inferences to be made regarding program efficacy.

Results: Data analysis is ongoing; however, preliminary analyses indicate positive health outcomes associated with the described approach. Staff report direct benefits including enhanced glycemic control, weight loss, and reductions in pharmacotherapy requirements resulting in decreased financial burden. Indirect benefits include improved inmate behavior, increased self-esteem, and enhanced inmate confidence regarding their abilities to self-manage.

Conclusions: Final results and conclusions will be available at the time of presentation and should provide additional insight into the efficacy and potential implications of this approach to diabetes management.

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Apr 16th, 2:40 PM

Observational Outcomes of a Multicomponent Diabetes Management Program in Inmates

Background: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic medical condition placing significant financial burden on the prison healthcare system. Changing demographics in prisons have challenged facilities to develop innovative disease management approaches to enhance outcomes while decreasing expenditures. Programs focused on self-management strategies have demonstrated efficacy through enhanced glycemic control, prevention of adverse outcomes, and reductions in associated healthcare costs.

Purpose: This study aims to analyze one prison’s approach to diabetes management by examining qualitative data regarding observed health outcomes. The program incorporates diabetes education, nutritional counseling, self-monitoring techniques, lifestyle modification, and incentives for active participation to encourage an active role in health and wellness.

Methods: Data were collected through personal interviews with members of the healthcare team overseeing those inmates participating in the program. A standard questionnaire was utilized to evaluate staff’s perceptions and observed outcomes associated with this approach. Data collected are being examined using content analysis to assess for trends or variations in participant responses, allowing for inferences to be made regarding program efficacy.

Results: Data analysis is ongoing; however, preliminary analyses indicate positive health outcomes associated with the described approach. Staff report direct benefits including enhanced glycemic control, weight loss, and reductions in pharmacotherapy requirements resulting in decreased financial burden. Indirect benefits include improved inmate behavior, increased self-esteem, and enhanced inmate confidence regarding their abilities to self-manage.

Conclusions: Final results and conclusions will be available at the time of presentation and should provide additional insight into the efficacy and potential implications of this approach to diabetes management.