2014 Conference

Event Title

Panel 5: "There’s No Shelter for Hookers”: Social Services Gaps and Access Barriers Among Street-Involved Women"

Presenter Information

Misty L. Heil, University of Wyoming

Location

Business Building, Room #24

Start Date

4-12-2014 9:45 AM

End Date

4-12-2014 11:00 AM

Description

Based upon three years of ethnographic research with approximately one hundred women engaged in street-based sex work and problematic substance use, this article explores women’s perceptions of and experiences with social services gaps and access barriers. Women identified service provision gaps with respect to housing, safety, mental health, employment-related skills training, and harm reduction. Yet women also described barriers to accessing available services as part of a totalizing and iterative process whereby restrictive service provision terms, previous negative experiences with service providers, criminalization, stigma, and lack of knowledge about available services actively discouraged them from help-seeking, even when they felt that they wanted or needed assistance. Findings suggest a need for further critical exploration of the complex means by which the state, and society more broadly, continues to absolve itself of responsibility for street-involved women who violate its laws and moral practices, thereby holding them responsible for their own victimization.

Comments

Panel Chair: Dr. Helfgott

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 12th, 9:45 AM Apr 12th, 11:00 AM

Panel 5: "There’s No Shelter for Hookers”: Social Services Gaps and Access Barriers Among Street-Involved Women"

Business Building, Room #24

Based upon three years of ethnographic research with approximately one hundred women engaged in street-based sex work and problematic substance use, this article explores women’s perceptions of and experiences with social services gaps and access barriers. Women identified service provision gaps with respect to housing, safety, mental health, employment-related skills training, and harm reduction. Yet women also described barriers to accessing available services as part of a totalizing and iterative process whereby restrictive service provision terms, previous negative experiences with service providers, criminalization, stigma, and lack of knowledge about available services actively discouraged them from help-seeking, even when they felt that they wanted or needed assistance. Findings suggest a need for further critical exploration of the complex means by which the state, and society more broadly, continues to absolve itself of responsibility for street-involved women who violate its laws and moral practices, thereby holding them responsible for their own victimization.