2014 Conference

Event Title

Panel 2: "The Romanization and Continuity of Dacian Culture"

Location

Business Building, Room #24

Start Date

4-12-2014 8:15 AM

End Date

4-12-2014 9:30 AM

Description

Theories on the effects of Roman presence in the Roman Empire’s province of Dacia, collectively referred to as Romanization, are presented as evidence of who the native Dacians were and would become as a result of contact with the Romans. I seek to address these theories with the intent of highlighting their invalidities and conjectural assumptions. While Roman occupation of Dacia produced rather dramatic changes in the lives of every ethnic group within the region, it was in no way the sole or even primary catalyst of their cultural change. Many of these theories established throughout the twentieth century on who the Dacians were and how Roman colonization and decolonization affected them are incomplete at best and void of empirical factual evidence at worst. Dacian cultures and their relationship with colonizers from the Roman world cast doubt on the theories of total Romanization and lasting cultural continuity within Dacia. Instead the current focus on Romanization within Dacia should focus more on the regional and even micro-regional level rather than focusing on the big theories and grand processes. Historians must take into account the multifaceted and largely unknown complex structure of Dacian culture, while considering the ethnic diversity and history of population fluctuations that have long played a role in shaping the region, before drawing conclusions on how Romanized the region had become and stayed over the last two millennia.

Comments

Panel Chair: Dr. Logan

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Apr 12th, 8:15 AM Apr 12th, 9:30 AM

Panel 2: "The Romanization and Continuity of Dacian Culture"

Business Building, Room #24

Theories on the effects of Roman presence in the Roman Empire’s province of Dacia, collectively referred to as Romanization, are presented as evidence of who the native Dacians were and would become as a result of contact with the Romans. I seek to address these theories with the intent of highlighting their invalidities and conjectural assumptions. While Roman occupation of Dacia produced rather dramatic changes in the lives of every ethnic group within the region, it was in no way the sole or even primary catalyst of their cultural change. Many of these theories established throughout the twentieth century on who the Dacians were and how Roman colonization and decolonization affected them are incomplete at best and void of empirical factual evidence at worst. Dacian cultures and their relationship with colonizers from the Roman world cast doubt on the theories of total Romanization and lasting cultural continuity within Dacia. Instead the current focus on Romanization within Dacia should focus more on the regional and even micro-regional level rather than focusing on the big theories and grand processes. Historians must take into account the multifaceted and largely unknown complex structure of Dacian culture, while considering the ethnic diversity and history of population fluctuations that have long played a role in shaping the region, before drawing conclusions on how Romanized the region had become and stayed over the last two millennia.