Presenter Information

Rob Streeter, University of Wyoming

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

First Advisor

Dr. Steve Barrett

Description

Much research on the Musca domestica machine vision sensor has already been conducted at the University of Wyoming. This on-going project is working to increase the capabilities and the ruggedness of the sensor, and characterize the sensor behavior. The sensor illustrates a number of superior qualities when compared to standard vision sensors. I worked to implement light filtering techniques and long-range sensing capabilities. The light filtering seeks to remove ambient light and reduce noise in the sensor signal. This design was tested and works very well. The long-range objective tests seek to verify sensor function through a telescope. Further tests will be required to provide conclusive long-range data. My research led to a better sensor platform, and utilized advanced, time-saving assembly techniques. This continuing project allows for graduate research upon the completion of my undergraduate degree in May 2011. My contribution to the project was beneficial and ground-breaking, however the project is far from completion and future involvement would only aid more.

Comments

Oral Presentation, Wyoming NSF EPSCoR

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Musca domestica Based Machine Vision Sensor; a Continuing Project

Much research on the Musca domestica machine vision sensor has already been conducted at the University of Wyoming. This on-going project is working to increase the capabilities and the ruggedness of the sensor, and characterize the sensor behavior. The sensor illustrates a number of superior qualities when compared to standard vision sensors. I worked to implement light filtering techniques and long-range sensing capabilities. The light filtering seeks to remove ambient light and reduce noise in the sensor signal. This design was tested and works very well. The long-range objective tests seek to verify sensor function through a telescope. Further tests will be required to provide conclusive long-range data. My research led to a better sensor platform, and utilized advanced, time-saving assembly techniques. This continuing project allows for graduate research upon the completion of my undergraduate degree in May 2011. My contribution to the project was beneficial and ground-breaking, however the project is far from completion and future involvement would only aid more.