Department

Division of Social Work

First Advisor

Dr. Kathleen McKinney

Description

This study will examine the differences in well-being reported by traditional and nontraditional University of Wyoming social work undergraduate students. Measures will be taken using a combination of wellness scales, as well as a demographics survey. The utilized scales include: Index of Self-Esteem (ISE) scale; Provision of Social Relations (PSR) scale; Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the General Well-Being Scale (GWBS). Many variables may influence the well-being of a student; therefore, this study will investigate factors such as demographics, perceived social support, stress levels, and self-esteem. The results will indicate the interrelationship among these variables and their impact on the well-being of traditional and nontraditional University of Wyoming social work undergraduate students. It is expected that for traditional and nontraditional students, lower reported levels of stress, as well as higher levels of self-esteem and perceived social support will be associated with higher levels of overall well-being. Furthermore, it is expected that the nontraditional student will report lower levels of well-being due to their increased roles and responsibilities than the traditional student.

Comments

Oral Presentation, Division of Social Work

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Well-Being: A Comparison of Traditional and Nontraditional University of Wyoming Social Work Students

This study will examine the differences in well-being reported by traditional and nontraditional University of Wyoming social work undergraduate students. Measures will be taken using a combination of wellness scales, as well as a demographics survey. The utilized scales include: Index of Self-Esteem (ISE) scale; Provision of Social Relations (PSR) scale; Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), the General Well-Being Scale (GWBS). Many variables may influence the well-being of a student; therefore, this study will investigate factors such as demographics, perceived social support, stress levels, and self-esteem. The results will indicate the interrelationship among these variables and their impact on the well-being of traditional and nontraditional University of Wyoming social work undergraduate students. It is expected that for traditional and nontraditional students, lower reported levels of stress, as well as higher levels of self-esteem and perceived social support will be associated with higher levels of overall well-being. Furthermore, it is expected that the nontraditional student will report lower levels of well-being due to their increased roles and responsibilities than the traditional student.