Event Title

Chinese Aquaculture

Presenter Information

Cobus Block, University of Wyoming

Department

International Studies

First Advisor

Dr. Mariah Ehmke

Description

China has a rich history of aquaculture dating back more than 2000 years. After China instituted economic reforms in the late 1970s, farmers and local governments rapidly increased aquaculture production. Today China is by far the largest producer and exporter of aquaculture products in the world. Aquaculture has been tremendously helpful in providing Chines e farmers with a way to diversify their production in a profitable manner; however, a number of issues face the industry today threaten to undermine its continued success. This paper investigates these issues with specific emphasis on those issues most af fecting small farmers. It utilizes interviews and field research in addition to data analysis to draw conclusions about the state of aquaculture in China. Throughout, this paper focuses on how aquaculture can be better utilized to increase the economic w ellbeing of rural Chinese. The results of this research suggest that an array of issues ranging from transportation to pharmaceutical regulation hinder further development in the industry.

Comments

Oral Presentation, UW Honors Program

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Chinese Aquaculture

China has a rich history of aquaculture dating back more than 2000 years. After China instituted economic reforms in the late 1970s, farmers and local governments rapidly increased aquaculture production. Today China is by far the largest producer and exporter of aquaculture products in the world. Aquaculture has been tremendously helpful in providing Chines e farmers with a way to diversify their production in a profitable manner; however, a number of issues face the industry today threaten to undermine its continued success. This paper investigates these issues with specific emphasis on those issues most af fecting small farmers. It utilizes interviews and field research in addition to data analysis to draw conclusions about the state of aquaculture in China. Throughout, this paper focuses on how aquaculture can be better utilized to increase the economic w ellbeing of rural Chinese. The results of this research suggest that an array of issues ranging from transportation to pharmaceutical regulation hinder further development in the industry.