Department

Department of Mechanical Engine ering

First Advisor

Dr. Ray Fertig

Description

Since its design, the U.S. Army has reinforced a sp ecific combat vehicle with additional armor, nearly doubling its original weight. With the added load, the vehicle’s differential components can fail, and a particular splined shaft is the weak link. To m a int a in these v e hi c l e s, the Army p e r iodi ca l l y disassembles and re builds them, at which time they inspect this splined shaft. The shaft is rejected for reinstallation if it has any signs of plastic twist deformation. Currently the shafts are visually inspected, but angles of twist less than 1° are un detectable to the naked eye. The U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity (AM S AA) h a s re qu e st e d that 3AS Engineering, a University of Wyoming Mechanical Engineering Senior Design team, design an insp ec tion tool th a t ca n d e t ec t angles of twist less th an 1 °. This tool must have a resolution of 0.01°, an inspection duration of ≤ 5 minutes, and operate with shafts of varying diameters and lengths. The amount of deformation on the shaft surface corresponding to twist of 0.01° is less than the machining tol erances indicating no single measurement on the shaft could decipher between twist and machining effects. This is overcome by taking thousands of measurements and statistically analyzing the data to detect trends indicating twist. The tool will be deliver ed to AMSAA in May 2013.

Comments

Oral and Poster Presentation

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Shaft Twist Inspection Tool

Since its design, the U.S. Army has reinforced a sp ecific combat vehicle with additional armor, nearly doubling its original weight. With the added load, the vehicle’s differential components can fail, and a particular splined shaft is the weak link. To m a int a in these v e hi c l e s, the Army p e r iodi ca l l y disassembles and re builds them, at which time they inspect this splined shaft. The shaft is rejected for reinstallation if it has any signs of plastic twist deformation. Currently the shafts are visually inspected, but angles of twist less than 1° are un detectable to the naked eye. The U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Activity (AM S AA) h a s re qu e st e d that 3AS Engineering, a University of Wyoming Mechanical Engineering Senior Design team, design an insp ec tion tool th a t ca n d e t ec t angles of twist less th an 1 °. This tool must have a resolution of 0.01°, an inspection duration of ≤ 5 minutes, and operate with shafts of varying diameters and lengths. The amount of deformation on the shaft surface corresponding to twist of 0.01° is less than the machining tol erances indicating no single measurement on the shaft could decipher between twist and machining effects. This is overcome by taking thousands of measurements and statistically analyzing the data to detect trends indicating twist. The tool will be deliver ed to AMSAA in May 2013.