Department

Program of Religious Studies

First Advisor

Dr. Quincy D. Newell

Description

Beginning in the late 19th century, Zionism – the desire by Jews for a Jewish homeland – began to emerge as a dominating geopolitical movement. By the time Israel gained statehood in 1948, Zionism’s definition expanded to encapsulate competing Jewish and Christian theologies, a s well as ethnic and political philosophies. I argue that religious Zionism has permeated the political discourse and created an American Zionism that creates a view of the Middle East that influences the way Americans talk about Israel, Arabs, and Muslims . This paper argues it is important for Americans to understand a movement that dictates how their government spends billions of dollars every year, as well as how the government dictates foreign policy toward the Middle East. Contained is a brief history of Zionism, as well as an overview of the theological views of Christians who wholeheartedly support Israel. I use Interviews with local Christian Zionists, as well as excerpts from online message boards to provide insight to the way the average American Z ionist discusses the Middle East in ways that mirror the ways Evangelical Christians discuss the end of the world.

Comments

Oral Presentation, UW Honors Program

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Awaiting The End: The Eschatology of American - Israeli Relations

Beginning in the late 19th century, Zionism – the desire by Jews for a Jewish homeland – began to emerge as a dominating geopolitical movement. By the time Israel gained statehood in 1948, Zionism’s definition expanded to encapsulate competing Jewish and Christian theologies, a s well as ethnic and political philosophies. I argue that religious Zionism has permeated the political discourse and created an American Zionism that creates a view of the Middle East that influences the way Americans talk about Israel, Arabs, and Muslims . This paper argues it is important for Americans to understand a movement that dictates how their government spends billions of dollars every year, as well as how the government dictates foreign policy toward the Middle East. Contained is a brief history of Zionism, as well as an overview of the theological views of Christians who wholeheartedly support Israel. I use Interviews with local Christian Zionists, as well as excerpts from online message boards to provide insight to the way the average American Z ionist discusses the Middle East in ways that mirror the ways Evangelical Christians discuss the end of the world.