Department

Department of Psychology

First Advisor

Dr. Carolyn Pepper

Description

Approximately 27 to 35% adults engage in Non - Suicidal Self - Injury (NSSI), or the deliberate destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent (Brown et al., 2007; Favazza, 1998; Gratz 2001). Past research indicates that LGBT individuals are significantly more likely to report engaging in NSSI (Deliberto, 2008; House & Horn, 2011), however differences in coping strategies have remained unexamined. I hypothesized that individuals who we re a sexual minority would report greater forms of dysfunctional coping. Participants were recruited online from international mental health forums, and completed an internet survey. Self - report measures included an assessment of coping strategies using the COPE (Carver, Sheier, & Weintraub, 1989), and NSSI using the Deliberate Self - Harm Inventory (DSHI; Gratz, 2001). A total of 399 individuals participated in the study (90.7% female), with an average age of 27.17. Heterosexual orientation was endorsed by 65.1% of participants. LGBT individuals reported engaging in more forms of NSSI, t(397) = - 3.68, p < .001. LGBT individuals engaged in greater mental disengagement, more humor, and less religious coping. Results suggest that in samples with evidence o f high psychological distress (e.g., NSSI), few differences in coping are apparent. Clinical implications highlight the need to focus on effective coping strategies in treatment.

Comments

Oral and Poster Presentation s

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Ex amining Self - Injury and Coping Based on Sexual Orientation

Approximately 27 to 35% adults engage in Non - Suicidal Self - Injury (NSSI), or the deliberate destruction of body tissue without suicidal intent (Brown et al., 2007; Favazza, 1998; Gratz 2001). Past research indicates that LGBT individuals are significantly more likely to report engaging in NSSI (Deliberto, 2008; House & Horn, 2011), however differences in coping strategies have remained unexamined. I hypothesized that individuals who we re a sexual minority would report greater forms of dysfunctional coping. Participants were recruited online from international mental health forums, and completed an internet survey. Self - report measures included an assessment of coping strategies using the COPE (Carver, Sheier, & Weintraub, 1989), and NSSI using the Deliberate Self - Harm Inventory (DSHI; Gratz, 2001). A total of 399 individuals participated in the study (90.7% female), with an average age of 27.17. Heterosexual orientation was endorsed by 65.1% of participants. LGBT individuals reported engaging in more forms of NSSI, t(397) = - 3.68, p < .001. LGBT individuals engaged in greater mental disengagement, more humor, and less religious coping. Results suggest that in samples with evidence o f high psychological distress (e.g., NSSI), few differences in coping are apparent. Clinical implications highlight the need to focus on effective coping strategies in treatment.