Presenter Information

Caitlin Bush, University of Wyoming

Department

Department of Botany

First Advisor

Dr. Brent Ewers

Description

The study of snow processes is imperative to understanding the effects of precipitation in a mountainous environment. However, collecting data in the field proves to be an arduous process. An alternative to field work is the use of time-lapse photography to assess snow cover and snow properties. Previous studies have shown that this is an appropriate manner in which to learn more about the spatial distribution of snow as well as its evolution over a period of time in this particular type of environment. My project design will attempt to utilize time-lapse photography through the use of multiple game cameras at multiple sites. Cameras will be programmed to take digital photos at regular intervals, and snow measures will be taken using four meter stakes throughout the site. The photos will then be analyzed using a digital imagery analysis program to extract data including snow depth and snow cover. This data will then be used to further understand snow interception, snow behavior on differing topographies, and how snowfall affects the water budget of each site.

Comments

Oral Presentation, EPSCoR

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Observation of Snow Processes through Time-lapse Photography

The study of snow processes is imperative to understanding the effects of precipitation in a mountainous environment. However, collecting data in the field proves to be an arduous process. An alternative to field work is the use of time-lapse photography to assess snow cover and snow properties. Previous studies have shown that this is an appropriate manner in which to learn more about the spatial distribution of snow as well as its evolution over a period of time in this particular type of environment. My project design will attempt to utilize time-lapse photography through the use of multiple game cameras at multiple sites. Cameras will be programmed to take digital photos at regular intervals, and snow measures will be taken using four meter stakes throughout the site. The photos will then be analyzed using a digital imagery analysis program to extract data including snow depth and snow cover. This data will then be used to further understand snow interception, snow behavior on differing topographies, and how snowfall affects the water budget of each site.