Natural Gas to BTX via Methanol

Ali Almubarak, University of Wyoming
Rashed Alrashed, University of Wyoming
Weston Hubele, University of Wyoming
Ben Pelton, University of Wyoming
Shane Whipple, University of Wyoming

Oral Presentation

Description

There is currently a large glut of cheap natural gas in the continental United States. Traditionally, BTX (Benzene, Toluene and Xylene) has been manufactured by using crude oil as a feedstock, but as of late alternative methods using natural gas have largely been commercialized. The process intends to efficiently convert natural gas into the more valuable product, BTX. The first step involves converting the natural gas into syngas consisting of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The syngas is then converted into methanol by using three parallel packed bed reactors. The methanol is purified and sent to a reactor along with purchased ethylene and propylene, where it is converted into BTX. The BTX reactor uses a newly patented catalyst technology. The BTX is separated and sold along with many other valuable byproducts such as hydrogen and naphthalene.

 

Natural Gas to BTX via Methanol

There is currently a large glut of cheap natural gas in the continental United States. Traditionally, BTX (Benzene, Toluene and Xylene) has been manufactured by using crude oil as a feedstock, but as of late alternative methods using natural gas have largely been commercialized. The process intends to efficiently convert natural gas into the more valuable product, BTX. The first step involves converting the natural gas into syngas consisting of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The syngas is then converted into methanol by using three parallel packed bed reactors. The methanol is purified and sent to a reactor along with purchased ethylene and propylene, where it is converted into BTX. The BTX reactor uses a newly patented catalyst technology. The BTX is separated and sold along with many other valuable byproducts such as hydrogen and naphthalene.