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SPECIAL SECTION: PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSUASION SYMPOSIUM

Editor's Note

In his book discussing the various theories and strategies utilized in persuasive writing, author Michael R. Smith wrote: “One of a lawyer’s primary functions, by definition, is to serve as an advocate for his or her clients. As an advocate, a lawyer’s job is to persuade. What’s more, much of the persuasion that lawyers achieve is done through writing.” This special section of the Wyoming Law Review explores some of the areas in which the fields of psychology and lawyering intersect, including the ability to write persuasively. Michael R. Smith, Advanced Legal Writing: Theories and Strategies in Persuasive Writing 3 (3d ed. 2013).

The 2015–2016 Editorial Board is pleased to present this special section on the Psychology of Persuasion. This publication is an outgrowth of the Psychology of Persuasion Conference, which took place at the University of Wyoming College of Law in Laramie, Wyoming on September 18–19, 2015. The Conference was made possible with the hard work and dedication of The Center for the Study of Written Advocacy of the University of Wyoming College of Law and the Department of Psychology of the University of Wyoming. The Wyoming Law Review would like to thank Michael R. Smith and Kenneth D. Chestek whose continuous support has led to this significant and unique compilation of scholarship.

Articles

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Emotions in the Courtroom: How Sadness, Fear, Anger, and Disgust Affect Jurors’ Decisions
Article
Victoria Estrada-Reynolds, Kimberly A. Schweitzer, and Narina Nuñez

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Special Section

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Introduction to Psychology of Persuasion Symposium
Special Section
Kenneth D. Chestek